Fuel System Testing - Fuel Pump - Injector - Regulator - Relay - Sensor
Fuel System Testing – Fuel Pump – Injector – Regulator – Relay – Sensor

Choose Your Fuel System Testing Help Topic Below

Fuel Leak – If You Smell Fuel This Could Be A Sign Of A Fuel Leak

Fuel System Related Problems – Not Always Easy To Solve

Mechanical Fuel Pumps – Basic Information And Troubleshooting

Fuel Pressure Regulator – FAQ – Do You Have The Correct Pressure

Fuel Pump Issues – Excessive Heat – Contamination From Dirt and Rust

Engine Fuel System Testing – Proper Testing With Solutions

Fuel Pressure Regulators – Function, Failure Symptoms And Testing

Automatic Shutdown (ASD) Relay – Function – Failure – Testing

Fuel Pump Relay – Function And Testing Procedures

Noid Light – How To Test Fuel Injectors Using A Noid Light

Fuel Wash – How To Eliminate This Potentially Serious Problem

Fuel Injectors – Will Usually Only Fail In One Of Three Ways

Gas Getting Into Oil – What Can Cause This To Happen ?

Fuel Pressure Regulator – FAQ – Do You Have The Correct Pressure

Common Fuel Pump Related No Start Problems – What Should You Check

Fuel Getting Into Engine Oil – Causing Premature Wear Of Engine Parts


Fuel System Testing – Fuel Pump – Injector – Regulator – Relay – Sensor

Common Fuel Delivery Systems

So, The (PCM) commands the fuel pump to; apply 35-65 psi of fuel pressure to the injectors. Consequently, By grounding the primary fuel pump relay circuit.

One And Two Line Fuel Delivery Systems:

  • On two-line fuel delivery systems. So, an external vacuum-modulated fuel pressure regulator controls the fuel pressure. Consequently, The two-line fuel delivery system; returns excess fuel to the tank using a return line.
  • In contrast, On a single-line fuel delivery systems. So, an internal non-modulated fuel pressure regulator; in the fuel pump module controls the fuel pressure. But, The single-line fuel delivery system uses the same line.

Finally, Most conventional fuel delivery systems; include a Schrader valve at the fuel injector rail. Furthermore, allowing for mechanical fuel pressure testing.

When the ignition switch is turned on; the fuel pump is activated. So, It does this for several seconds to prime the fuel injectors. The fuel pump activates again during cranking. But, deactivates when the ignition key is released. When the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor; indicates to the (PCM) that the engine is running; the (PCM) continues to activate the fuel pump relay; without input from the ignition switch.

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